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Author: DFNS

The Huawei indictments and the end of trust

By Tom Uren Huawei’s behaviour, coupled with the Chinese government’s wide-ranging commercial espionage, is eroding trust in the global supply chain. Rebuilding that trust will take work. Two sensational US indictments unsealed on Tuesday...

Labour mobility and medical mobility: lessons from Vanuatu

By Rochelle-Lee Bailey and Michael Sorensen Vanuatu is the largest sending country of seasonal workers to both Australia’s Seasonal Worker Programme (SWP) and New Zealand’s Recognised Seasonal Employer Scheme (RSE), with over 8,000 workers...

Cooperation for a new age of volatility

By Sri Mulyani Indrawati Managing an economy is not for the faint of heart. Policymakers must constantly monitor the ever-evolving global economic landscape, and anticipate lightning-fast changes that can breed volatility and uncertainty. As...

North of 26° south and the security of Australia

By John Coyne In terms of Australia’s first, and primary, strategic defence objective—‘to deter, deny and defeat any attempt by a hostile country or non-state actor to attack, threaten or coerce Australia’—it seems that...

Dealing with rising public debt in the Pacific

By Rommel Rabanal and Cara Tinio Some degree of caution is required in assessing debt sustainability in the Pacific. The debt to GDP ratio, a commonly used benchmark, may look disproportionately high at first...

A better way to stay connected with the South Pacific

By Geoff Heriot Five years ago, Australia’s recently elected Liberal–National Party government released a report called Towards responsible government. Produced by an ad hoc National Commission of Audit, it purported to review ‘the scope...

Plan ‘B’ for the F-35

By Marcus Hellyer The Australian Defence Force’s equipment is good and getting better. But the ADF’s current and planned force structures have some significant limitations in their ability to deliver some crucial military effects....

Indonesia boosts its military presence in the Natuna Islands

By John McBeth When Indonesian Foreign Minister Retno Marsudi delivered her traditional annual foreign policy review recently, she made a point of referring to last month’s separatist slaughter of 19 construction workers in rebellious...

How Europe’s populists can win by losing

By Mark Leonard Will the European Parliament elections this May result in a political revolution? Populist and nationalist parties certainly hope so. They are promising not just to overturn the Brussels establishment, but also...

John Howard, multilateralism and landmines

By Graeme Dobell For political tragics, there’s not much than can surprise about John Howard. His consistency reaches towards the rigid. But here’s a statement to puzzle tragics: J.W. Howard—when in power—was a good,...

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